Rose Drop

My beautiful Gertrude Jekyll rose is about to bloom — time for a Rose Drop.  This recipe was recently featured in the May 2017 Sunset magazine.  Enjoy!

For me, the garden is a place of deep inspiration for my cooking.  I have a beautiful rose bush* — right now in full bloom with deep pink, fragrant blossoms.  A few years ago, while weeding alongside this righteous proclamation of Spring, I envisioned a cocktail — the Rose Drop.

I imagined the luscious scent of my rose concentrated in one beautiful cocktail.  After a bit of tinkering, I was rewarded with a lovely surprise when I infused the petals of this rose, which I reveal to you in the recipe below.  Enjoy!

Gertrude Jekyll Rose

Gertrude Jekyll Rose

For the Rose infused vodka:
Start by picking 9 – 10 full rose blossoms.  Rinse them and pluck the petals.

Rose petals

Rose petals

Lightly pack all the petals into a large lidded jar.  I used a 20 oz glass lidded working jar.  Add vodka to the brim, then cover and place in the fridge.  Give it a shake after an hour or so.

roses in vodka - the first minute

rose petals in vodka – the first minute

After a couple hours the petals will have been drained of most of their color, and the infused vodka will be a pale straw pink color.  (When this first happened, I was most disappointed, as I was really hoping for the color and fragrance of my rose in my cocktail.  I was stunningly surprised later, when I used this infusion in a cocktail, with the addition of acidic lemon juice — a little food chemistry magic to come.)

rose infused vodka - after three hours in the fridge

rose infused vodka – after three hours in the fridge

rose infused vodka, after straining

rose infused vodka, after straining

Strain the rose infused vodka into a jar and store airtight in the fridge until you’re ready for a cocktail.  Enjoy! (in moderation, of course)

The Rose Drop
(makes two)

4 oz Rose infused vodka (see recipe, above)
1 oz fresh squeezed lemon juice
1 – 2 oz simple syrup** (add to suit your sweetness preference)
4 ice cubes

Stir all ingredients together until very cold.  When you add the lime juice to the rose infused vodka the beautiful colors of the rose revert to their acidified state and shine brilliant pink.  And the rose scent blooms in the glass.  Strain into two lovely cocktail glasses, garnish with a rose petal, and enjoy.

* My rose bush, a Gertrude Jekyll Rose, is grown with no pesticides of any kind.  This is very important for using roses petals in cooking — don’t use any roses if you’re not entirely sure that there are no systemic or foliar pesticides that have been used on your flowers.

**simple syrup:  Blend equal proportions by volume sugar and boiling water.  Cool before using.

 

Jasmine Ice Cream

My pink jasmine is in full bloom and its intoxicating fragrance beckoned me to use it in my kitchen.

Pink Jasmine blossoms

Here is my take on a simple, creamy and luscious custard ice cream gently perfumed with fresh pink jasmine.

Jasmine Ice Cream

I use my trusty Cuisinart ice cream maker for homemade ice cream.  It only takes about 20 minutes to churn the cold base into soft serve ice cream.  I store the cylinder in the freezer so it’s always at the ready.  Enjoy!

Jasmine Ice Cream, just after churning

Jasmine Ice Cream
(makes a quart of ice cream)

1 pint heavy whipping cream
1 cup milk
2/3 cup sugar
2 cups fresh pink jasmine blossoms, stems and leaves removed
1/8 tsp sea salt
2 egg yolks

Combine cream, milk, sugar, salt, and jasmine blossoms in a medium sauce pan.  Heat over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until hot but not quite simmering.  Do not let come to a boil, but get it close.   Turn off heat, cover, and allow the blossoms to steep in the hot cream mixture until they are limp – about 15 – 20 minutes.  Strain off and discard the blossoms, and return the hot cream mixture to the pan.

Place the two egg yolks into a heat proof mixing bowl.

Bring the cream mixture to a gentle boil.  Pour a couple tablespoons of hot cream mixture into the egg yolks while stirring the egg yolks.  After the hot cream mixture is incorporated, add about 1/2 cup more, stirring all the while.  Return the pan with the remaining hot cream mixture to the stove over medium heat, and whisk in the egg yolk mixture.  (this is called tempering the yolks, BTW).  Stirring all the time, bring the mixture to a gentle simmer and cook for one minute.  Strain into a quart container, cover, and chill completely — at least 6 hours.

Freeze the custard base until thick and soft serve consistency.  Store in the freezer for a couple hours to firm up the ice cream.